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HIECSS

High-Speed Electromechanical Energy Conversion Systems

The Academy of Finland’s Centre of Excellence in High-Speed Electromechanical Energy Conversion Systems (HiECSs) brings together key Finnish academic experts on electrical machines, drives, mechanical transmission, and related system analysis, with the aim of elevating the modelling and analysis capabilities and methodologies eventually leading to the emergence of highly sustainable solutions and products necessary for a cleaner future.

The emerging hydrogen economy and electrification of aviation are opening new application areas for electromechanical energy conversion, namely compressor and propulsion motors as well as turbine generators. Increasing the operating speeds and frequencies of such machines enables improving their material efficiency and reducing their size and weight. High-speed and high-frequency technologies hence offer a sustainable solution for future energy conversion needs. However, the current modelling and design practices related to the electromagnetic and mechanical behaviour of machines and drivetrains are not capable of accounting for the physical effects that arise at higher frequencies, which prevents optimal and safe realisation of such systems. This poses a major scientific challenge. The HiECSs project brings together experts in related fields to establish the necessary theories and tools for a renewed understanding of the electromagnetic and mechanical behaviour of high-speed electromechanical drivetrains, and thus lay the foundations for the next generation of high-speed electromechanical energy conversion technology.

CSC's role in the project builds on the long experience in developing advanced modeling techniques for electrical machines. The work is based on Elmer finite element software mainly developed at CSC and published under open source. High-speed electrical machines sets additional requirements to the modeling which will be main targets of CSC in this project. 

 

 

This project has received funding from the Academy of Finland.